Getting ready for round 2

14 03 2018

Arriving in Taupo one year on, the same feelings of anticipation and excitement crept up. There were butterflies, but a good kind.

This was familiar territory, one I’d conquered before.


The swim buoys were out, although not as far into the lake. A revised swim course would see us actually swim into the mouth of the Waikato River, meaning that we’d swim a shortened distance in the lake.

This year I arrived a day later. We’d driven a couple of hours north to stay with a friend before heading to Taupo early on the Thursday morning. I knew there was a bit for me to do on arrival, most importantly I had to check in. But I didn’t feel the need to be up there on the Wednesday. I’d get everything done.

At the registration tent a queue had formed well into Taupo Domain but rather than come back later, I chose to line up with the rest. Get it over and done with then I could relax. We probably waited for an hour before fronting up to the same volunteer who had checked me in last year! I recognised her straight away. She was the one who’d used a faux “Manchestoh” accent on me. Unsurprisingly her recollection of me was not the same.

Wristband applied like a home detention ankle bracelet, I was now committed.


One thing I was dreading was the weigh in. I don’t weight myself. It’s not a relevant measure to me. I’d much rather benchmark myself against how my clothes feel or how I look in the mirror. But I had to be weighed.

I didn’t feel thinner than last year. But I weighed in 2kgs lighter. Happy days! Less weight to lug around those 180kms on the bike.

I promptly went and ate a bacon butty to celebrate.

We were also asked to show where we came from on a world map. This was to represent to global nature of Ironman New Zealand. More than half the field had come from overseas to take on the challenge. Kiwis were the minority. I decided to show both places I consider home – my Instagram post said “I’m from here and here”. British pro racer Laura Siddall responded saying she’d done the same thing!


Once we’d settled into our bach I went about checking out the stash in the race pack. There wasn’t much worthy of note. The usual sachet of crap Invisible Zinc sun cream (more to come on that) and a mysterious envelope addressed to “Ironman Athlete”.

Inside I found a letter from Libby, from Taupo Intermediate School who said it must take a lot of grit and courage to do Ironman and gave me some motivational words for my race.

It was a touching thought, invoking more emotions at an already emotionally charged time.


A bit of prep followed, like packing transition bags and putting race stickers in all the relevant places. And before I knew it, it was time to head out to the Welcome function. It was great to catch up with my fellow squaddies, most of whom were attempting their first IM. Surprisingly the nerves were non-existant. There was a definite buzz around the table.

Plans were made to meet for our final swim before game day. A beautiful morning dawned with a flat calm lake to greet us. Despite having read the (favourable) weather forecasts for race day, part of me couldn’t help be cynical after our experience last year. Perfect conditions the day before and hideous winds on the day.

But that was last year. This was a whole new opportunity. The main thing was just getting the last little bit of training done. It was my first open water swim in fresh water this season. And it was so refreshing after so many Wellington harbour swims!


I headed back to the bach to complete a short bike and run. While on my ride, my rear gears were playing up. I’d had my bike serviced before I put my race wheels on (rookie error). So while the rear cassette on my race wheel is the same size as my normal wheel, it was obviously a little out.

Hubby and I worked out some logistics of taking my bike to the on site bike mechanics for a quick tune while he checked in for his race – the 70.3. I could then leave it there while we got lunch and went back to the house to get his bike.

Lunch wasn’t exactly what you would call “ideal” pre-race nutrition…but it was damn good (Thanks Pauly’s Diner!). I probably started Ironman the same weight I was last year after the post-weigh in feeds.

We both had to rack our bikes ready for the next day, and I had to drop off my transition bags. I make lists for England. And I followed my lists, ticking all my items off as I packed them. But once I dropped my bags off I started to have panics. I’d only photographed the contents of my run bag so started to panic that I’d forgotten something out of my bike bag. But really I knew it was 99.9% unlikely because of my lists! People (hubby included) laugh at my super organised race plan – but it’s a confidence builder/stress reliever for me.

Back at the house and the final few race pre activities got completed as I ticked more things off my list. Watch on charge. Dinner eaten. Race number tattoos applied.

A million alarms set.


All that was left to do was get some sleep….


Ironman Race Day: the rerun

29 04 2017

It’s become a tradition.

The Ironteam supporters from our training squad – those sane enough not to be doing that crazy Ironman thing – gather photos and video footage from the day to be compiled into a video memento.

In 2016 I volunteered at Ironman NZ and helped gather footage from within transition for that year’s epic.

At the time of that unveiling I felt rather inspired. But at the time I still said nope. Uh uh. No way. Not me.

Fast forward a year and I’m one of the many stars in our squad’s 2017 edition. And I’m so glad I changed my mind.

I’ll be back again one day. To hopefully feature in another edition.